Browse Tag

management

Difference between Managers vs. Leaders

I really enjoy reading and have some great admiration for the work and writings of Warren Bennis. In one of his books, “On Becoming a Leader” he describes his view of the differences between managers and leaders as follows:

The manager administers; the leader innovates.
The manager is a copy; the leader is an original.
The manager maintains; the leader develops.
The manager focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on people.
The manager relies on control; the leader inspires trust.
The manager accepts reality; the leader investigates it.
The manager has a short-range view; the leader has a long-range perspective.
The manager asks how and when; the leader asks what and why.
The manager has his or her eye always on the bottom line; the leader has his or her eye on the horizon.
The manager imitates; the leader originates.
The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it.
The manager is the classic good soldier; the leader is his or her own person.
The manager does things right; the leader does the right thing.

This is a great list and it has always caused me to pause a reflect on my own behaviour and ask “Where am I spending most of my time? Doing the left hand tasks or doing the right hand tasks?”

I have asked this question before but will ask it again, Are you “Managing” your children’s ministry or “Leading” your children’s ministry? What were you hired to do?

Are you hired for your children’s ministry to be a Leader or Manager

More and more senior pastors and boards tend to be on the look out for Leaders for their churches children’s ministries but they tend to keep hiring Managers of children’s ministries instead. I think to many the lines between managing and leading are becoming blurred.

If you are responsible for your local churches children’s ministries do you simply accept the budget, staff, tools, time, and authority you’ve been given and try to make the most of it? Or do you see bigger possibilities, and are you willing to try to convince those around you that there’s a better way?

Nobody knows both the threats and opportunities your position holds better than you. To have the perspective of just playing out the hand you’ve been dealt will in the end only frustrate you and is not in the best interest of your organization either.

If your Pastor, church, or board really wants to succeed (and I have never heard anyone ever say…I can’t wait until we fail), they don’t want you to simply follow orders either. They want you to solve problems, be creative, and recognize new opportunities. They want a leader in your position. Do they have that in you? Have the lines become blurred with you?

If so, allow me to use the words of Warren Bennis to help bring some clarity between the lines of Managing vs. Leading:

— The manager administers and the leader innovates.
— The manager maintains, the leader develops.
— The manager accepts the status quo; the leader is always questioning and challenging.
— The manager focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on people.
— The manager relies on control; the leader inspires trust.
— The manager has a short-range view; the leader has a long-range perspective.
— The manager asks ‘how’ and ‘when’; the leader asks ‘what’ and ‘why’.
— The manager imitates; the leader originates.
— The manager is a copy, the leader is an original.

Now go and give what your Pastor needs to have happen, and Lead!!

Are you a leader or manager

According to leadership expert Warren Bennis:

The manager administers and the leader innovates.
The manager maintains, the leader develops.
The manager accepts the status quo; the leader is always questioning and challenging.
The manager focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on people.
The manager relies on control; the leader inspires trust.
The manager has a short range view; the leader has a long range perspective.
The manager asks ‘how’ and ‘when’; the leader asks ‘what’ and ‘why’.
The manager imitates; the leader originates.
The manager is a copy, the leader is an original.

If this is true have you been leading or managing? Have you been hired to lead or manage? I think a lot of people want to lead or they have been hired to lead but they are only calling their managing – leadership. Then there are times when leaders are fulfilling the management role and must keep in perspective why they are in that management role, because they are not the head in that situation and if anything has two heads it is a freak.

So Lead with everything in you if you are to lead. Manage with everything that is within you if you are to manage.

What are your thoughts?

MBWA – Management By Walking Around

Most leaders would agree that staying in touch with their volunteer base is important. This leader-volunteer connection typically takes on the structured forms of town hall meetings, video broadcasts and planning sessions. But there are informal ways to stay in touch as well, often called “Management By Walking Around” (MBWA), a phrase coined in the 1980’s in the book In Search of Excellence. MBWA, the theory goes, helps senior leadership break down barriers that can often stall effective communication across an organization.

A time-stressed Leader may be tempted to skip the Walking Around part and only focus on the Management part of the MBWA equation, but that would be a mistake. Wise organizational leaders make use of both formal and informal communications channels.

Here could be a few ideas to take advantage of your MBWA with your team.

1. Revisit the structured ways that you interact with volunteers and or employees. Has attendance dipped, or conversation been stale at the last few meetings? Maybe it’s time to change things up a bit.

2. Wander virtually. Learn to use, and become comfortable with, social media. It’s the new water cooler. See Ten things you must know before using twitter or click over to Must knows about twittering . Really depending how long this post of mine has been out when you go to look for info on twitter, just Google it because you would be surprised how many are out there sharing how to use twitter.

3. Ask a trusted advisor how you can be more approachable. Oftentimes, executives are unaware of how imposing they are.

What would some of your ways not mentioned here be?

Secure yours before helping others

20110321-092338.jpg

I just finished flying to San Diego and back to Kansas City so that I could attend CPC 2011 for Kidology. At the start of each flight the attendant would give the speech that in the case of a change in the cabin atmosphere how masks would drop from the over head panels and would flow with oxygen. They would then continue to share the importance of securing our own mask first before helping others around us.

This announcement started me thinking of the importance of taking care of yourself so that you can take care of others. Here are a few ways that I work on this.

– Wake up at 5am to have my own Bible reading and time of prayer

– Watch what I am eating (even though there is a ton of room for improvement on this still for me.)

– Carve out time to invest in reading topics that I am interested in.

– Try to make sure I go to bed early enough (usually around 10:30-ish) and sleep in until 5am.

– I try to not work on the computer at least 30 minutes before bed. I have learned that parts of the brain stay alert and are not allowed to rest when we play video games, work on the computer, etc. before we go to bed.

– I keep an organized office space which helps me keep a piece of mind, which in turn allows me to stay happy and more productive.

These are a few ways I secure my mask first so that I am able to help others. What are a few of yours and how often do you live them out?

Children’s Pastors Are Middle-Managers

Children’s pastors are middle managers. They perform this function as a buffer between senior management, that is, the senior pastoral leadership, and the paid and volunteer children’s ministry staff members. It is a fine balance we live in as managers of one of the support ministries in the church. We serve our senior pastors like armor bearers, working steadily to bring about what God has put in their hearts. We also are charged to oversee (lead) the wellness of a department which typically has a larger volunteer base than any other ministry in the church. We are truly managers in the middle.

A strategic role of a middle manager is not simply to execute the strategies communicated by our senior pastors, but also to supplement them with our own creative ideas, initiatives, and inventions, driven by our first-hand knowledge of developments of other ministries and businesses which work with children and families.

This is what each of us who are children’s pastors get to face. It is reality that we live everyday. It is not easy and not many can make it through to the end. Those who realize this and make it through will prove to be a great asset to the Kingdom of God as we help steer our churches through many opportunities.

The bottom line is: it is never just about doing the same old stuff better, but also about creating the new. How are you adding value to your church, your pastor, and the people you serve? How well are you living as a middle manager?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...